Author Archives: Matthew Clark

JURASSIC PARK (1993): Part 3- Architecture and Materials

JURASSIC PARK PART 3

Production designed by Rick Carter, the final part that ‘sells’ Jurassic Park as a working, functioning resort is the construction of the infrastructure. An abundance of raw concrete is employed, which works on levels both inside and outside of the film’s narrative. The rough and raw material suggests a kind of primal, carved sort of look, but the fact that it’s merely concrete rather than stone or granite works perfectly with the artificial façade found on the tourist side everywhere else.

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JURASSIC PARK (1993): Part 2- Internal Information, Advertising and ID Systems

ADM JURASSIC PARK PART 2

Aside from the exterior Corporate Identity (see Part 1) of Jurassic Park, production designed by Rick Carter, there was a distinct and different internal bit of design behind the flash exterior of the park. Of particular note – but often over looked because of the much-mocked UNIX system used at the denouement – is the park control system.

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JURASSIC PARK (1993): Part 1- Corporate Branding, Identity and Signage

ADM JURASSIC PARK TITLE

The true brilliance of Jurassic Park’s look is neither the CGI dinosaurs nor the animatronic ones – it’s the cohesive whole of the theme park island that frames them and makes them more believable. Production Designer, Rick Carter’s look for Jurassic Park – both the theme park and the film – eschews Michael Crichton’s “Voyage to the Land Before Time that Time Lost” tinplate aesthetic for a cutting edge clean that is wonderfully 90’s, lurid and tacky. At the time it was incredibly fresh and while it’s easy to date it now, it doesn’t look particularly dated.

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An In-Depth Look at the Design of the ‘Prometheus’ Rovers

Prometheus Poster Art Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

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The production design for Prometheus surprised a lot of people when the first set stills leaked. Instead of the grungy, mechanical aesthetic of Alien, which it predates, Prometheus’ sets are clean, brightly lit, and very colourful. It’s texturing is much less heavy than Alien, and the reflective surfaces and bold, graphic palette seem a world away from the 1979 film’s muted golds, browns and creams. Ridley Scott’s influences for the look of Prometheus can be tracked back to the 1965 film Planet Of The Vampires – in fact the space suits for the Prometheus crew are taken almost verbatim from that film. Broadly speaking though, pulp sci-fi appears to be the major influence for the film’s look, mixing it’s tone and colour with updated version of the bulkheads and corridors of the original Nostromo setsPrometheus’ prop vehicles, the RT Rovers, continue this theme.

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