Tag Archives: Jack Fisk

The Master: Below the Line Interview

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The Master- Paul Thomas Anderson

THE INTERVIEW

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Check out this below the line interview for Paul Thomas Anderson‘s The Master with Production Designers, Jack Fisk & David Crank; Costume Designer, Mark Bridges and Editor, Leslie Jones.

Source: The Hot Button DP30 Series

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PRODUCTION DESIGN PORN: Terrence Malick, Jack Fisk and the Art of Minimalism

Filmmaker, Terrence Malick

Production Designer, Jack Fisk

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Definition of Minimalism: A design or style in which the simplest and fewest elements are used to create the maximum effect. A technique that is characterized by extreme spareness and simplicity.

I’ve been a big fan of Terrence Malick and Jack Fisk since I saw The Thin Red Line. Imagine my shock and awe when I saw the rest of their work. I often think of Andrew Wyeth’s Christina’s World when I think of Days of Heaven and that is a tribute to the way they painted their story with simple landscape and light during magic hour. Terrence clearly has a highly attuned eye for painterly composition and Fisk is not only able to realize Terry’s vision but catapult it to new heights in such a way that makes them the power team that they are. The Tree of Life this year has been a testament to the magic they share with their audience. The Tree of Life is a delightfully visual poem which enables the audience to ponder the nature of existence through the use of visual imagery and story minimalism. With this film I do believe Terrence and Jack have reached new heights in the search for beauty in cinema. Through their work I believe we can all learn that less really is more.

Jack Fisk Discusses his Work with Terrence and his Aesthetic:

“Terry and I have developed a relationship where we just go and look at locations together, for weeks, and that way we kind of get in sync on a picture. And then he says, “Whatever you do will be fine.” He’s so trusting, but I’ve worked so hard to fall in line with what he’s after. I think also over the years we’ve kind of developed similar tastes. Some of it came about because we never had any money, so we always had minimal set dressing and props, and we found out that we really like the way that looked. Even today, I spend most of my time taking stuff away rather than putting stuff onto a set. Just try to keep it simple, because if people aren’t confused by the background, they pay attention to what’s happening with the characters, I think. I try to create backgrounds that are easy to understand so they tell you in shorthand what you need to know about the place or the character and don’t distract you by giving you too much to look at. [The balance between simplicity and authenticity] is a hard one.

I’ve developed a real love of Edward Hopper. His paintings have a simplicity and an essence of location, so he’s probably who I reference the most – I think of him almost like an art director. You really feel the humans in those environments because there’s not a lot of distraction; he paints just what you need. The other artist I like is completely different and that’s Francis Bacon. The thing I really like about Francis Bacon is his passion. I look at his paintings and they’re like falling apart. He’ll put water-base paint on oils – whatever he does, he doesn’t worry about preserving it, but he worries about the moment. If he needs a dash of purple up there, he’ll put whatever purple he has. I appreciate that passion.”

~ Jack Fisk, from Filmmaker Magazine | Spring 2010

Terrence Malick and Jack Fisk’s Collaborations

Badlands (1973)

Badlands (1973)

Days of Heaven (1978)

Days of Heaven (1978)

Days of Heaven (1978)

The Thin Red Line (1998)

The New World (2005)

The Tree of Life (2011)

The Tree of Life (2011)

The Tree of Life (2011)

The Tree of Life (2011)

Jack Fisk’s Other Collaborations

Here is more smouldering examples of Jack Fisk’s production designs, this time with other lauded filmmakers. You’ll see below that his love for minimalism follows him on each project but his designs remain classic, beautiful and appropriate to the characters, time period, story and genre. He has a knack for choosing projects that suit his unique visual aesthetic. He also seems to love anything with fire.

Carrie (1976)

Carrie (1976)

Carrie (1976)

Carrie (1976)

Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

The Straight Story (1999)

Mulholland Dr. (2001)

The Invasion (2007)

There Will Be Blood (2007)

There Will Be Blood (2007)

There Will Be Blood (2007)

There Will Be Blood (2007)

There Will Be Blood (2007)

Water For Elephants (2011)

Water For Elephants (2011)

Water For Elephants (2011)

Water For Elephants (2011)

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Are you a fan of Terrence Malick or Jack Fisk? What is your favourite film designed by Jack Fisk and why?

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Rose XO.

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Water for Elephants Graphic Artist, Karen TenEyck, Shares Her Art Department Knowledge & Experience

I made a rule a while back that I wouldn’t reblog other people’s posts but I just found THE post that is making me break my own rule. So great I can’t not share this post from The Water For Elephants fan page with you all. The Graphic Designer of Water For Elephants shares her knowledge of the art department and her experience working under Jack Fisk, one of the greatest Production Designers of our time. Enjoy!

Rose XO.

CREW CORNER: Water for Elephants graphic artist, Karen TenEyck, shares her art and experience During the filming in Tennessee, we posted some crew pictures of the art department that caught my eye. What caught my eye wasn’t the actual picture but the comments the pictures were getting: Is that super art director, David Crank, at the table? Why yes it is! Oooo, la la. Now where’s Jack? xoxo OMG, it’s Jack Fisk and David Crank! I am in heaven!!!!! They are SOOOOOOOOOO awesome. The art department rocks!!! It’s just soooooooooo awesome to see … Read More

via Water for Elephants – The Movie Fan Site Starring Robert Pattinson, Reese Witherspoon & Christoph Waltz

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POSTER DESIGN: The Tree of Life New Poster Unveiled

Yesterday a brand new poster was released to the public for Terence Malick‘s upcoming film The Tree of Life. The new poster contains 70 images from the theatrical trailer, seen here, released in December. I love this as I probably watched that trailer 20 times already and who doesn’t want to look at gorgeous screen caps when they’re production designed by Jack Fisk? It gives a great look into the colour scheme of the film too. This is definitely one of the films this year I am truly excited about. Originally it was rumoured to premiere at Cannes but now the film has been given a May 7th release date in the UK. All I know is no matter what the release date is in North America my bum will be in that cinema seat.

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What do you think?

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Rose XO.
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TRAILER: The Tree of Life (2011)

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This past week the trailer for The Tree of Life was released to the public. I don’t know about you but I am waiting with baited breath to see Terrence Malick‘s new film, starring Brad Pitt and Sean Penn. The film is set to be released on May 27th by Fox Searchlight and is production designed by the incomparable Jack Fisk who follows Terrence Malick to every project. Minimal and raw, Jack Fisk is in a league of his own working with a director who cares intensely about his projects. What more could we ask for? Great acting and a great story perhaps? Based on the synopsis and trailer below I’d bet my first born child we’re going to get everything we want from this film and more. Maybe even the meaning of life? One can only hope.

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Left: First picture from the film | Right: Exterior of the family’s home

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From the Desk of Terrence Malick…..

We trace the evolution of an eleven-year-old boy in the Midwest, Jack, one of three brothers. At first all seems marvelous to the child. He sees as his mother does with the eyes of his soul. She represents the way of love and mercy, where the father tries to teach his son the world’s way of putting oneself first. Each parent contends for his allegiance, and Jack must reconcile their claims. The picture darkens as he has his first glimpses of sickness, suffering and death. The world, once a thing of glory, becomes a labyrinth.

From this story is that of adult Jack, a lost soul in a modern world, seeking to discover amid the changing scenes of time that which does not change: the eternal scheme of which we are a part. When he sees all that has gone into our world’s preparation, each thing appears a miracle—precious, incomparable. Jack, with his new understanding, is able to forgive his father and take his first steps on the path of life.

The story ends in hope, acknowledging the beauty and joy in all things, in the everyday and above all in the family—our first school—the only place that most of us learn the truth about the world and ourselves, or discover life’s single most important lesson, of unselfish love.

Source: American Film Market 2010 Booklet

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Are you excited yet?

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Rose XO.

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